University of California, San Diego students, faculty, and staff rally against Trump immigration ban

The first students, staff and faculty of UC San Diego’s graduate student union, the Graduate Student Labor Organization, rallied on campus on Wednesday, saying the president’s executive order restricting travel from six Muslim-majority countries is racist and dangerous.

The event was organized by the union and other student groups, as the university struggles to cope with an unprecedented influx of refugees and immigrants.

“This is not a temporary situation.

We will continue to fight for the basic human rights of our fellow citizens, including the right to life, liberty and security of every person on campus,” UC San Francisco Graduate Student Union President Sarah Kallen said in a statement.

“The university is the home to more than 3.8 million people, including over 500,000 students.

UC San Jose Chancellor Nancy O’Dell said in the same statement that the university is “unable to accept the actions of this administration, which are dangerous and divisive, and have no place on our campus.” “

We know that our voices will not be heard, that our power will not overcome the silence of those who have already been silenced, that this administration’s policies are not working for us, and that they have no intention of working for anyone else.”

UC San Jose Chancellor Nancy O’Dell said in the same statement that the university is “unable to accept the actions of this administration, which are dangerous and divisive, and have no place on our campus.”

UC Santa Cruz Vice Chancellor for Student Life Rebecca Cisneros said in her statement that UC San Cruz has seen an increase in the number of refugees from Syria and Iraq.

She said UC San Barbara is taking steps to assist those students, and UC Santa Barbara’s student union is considering a resolution to join in solidarity.

UC Davis Chancellor Nancy K. Johnson also expressed support for the university, saying in a Facebook post that she is committed to protecting the university from threats to its mission and values.

“Our students are the best and brightest in the world, and I cannot imagine a more powerful ally for our cause,” Johnson said.

“To that end, I am committed to working with UC San Pablo, UC Irvine, UC Santa Clara, UC Berkeley and UC Irvine Law School, to work together to build a world that honors the rights of all.

UC Irvine is also considering taking a stand, and the school is holding a forum on Wednesday on how to fight the executive order, which would bar people from Iran, Iraq, Libya, Somalia, Sudan, Syria and Yemen from entering the U.S. for 90 days. “

I urge everyone to join me in standing with them.”

UC Irvine is also considering taking a stand, and the school is holding a forum on Wednesday on how to fight the executive order, which would bar people from Iran, Iraq, Libya, Somalia, Sudan, Syria and Yemen from entering the U.S. for 90 days.

UC Irvine students, who are mostly from Asia, will attend the event.

The university’s Office of Equity, Diversity and Inclusion has released a statement saying it has received over 200 reports of hate crimes since the executive orders were signed.

It says UC Irvine will be “working with law enforcement and our allies to address the situation.”

The university said in an email to The Associated Press that it was “committed to respecting the rights and dignity of all people.”

UC Riverside Chancellor Mark Haskins said in his statement that “this administration is trying to divide us by race, gender, sexual orientation and national origin.

This executive order is a slap in the face to all of our people.”